A

TREATISE

ON

DIVINE UNION
 

DESIGNED TO POINT OUT SOME OF THE


INTIMATE RELATIONS BETWEEN GOD AND MAN

IN THE

HIGHER FORMS OF RELIGIOUS EXPERIENCE.


Thomas_Cogswell_Upham-c


BY
THOMAS C. UPHAM, D. D.
PROFESSOR OF MENTAL AND MORAL PHILOSOPHY IN BOWDOIN COLLEGE, MAINE.







BOSTON
CHARLES H. PEIRCE, AND COMPANY,
No. 5, CORNHILL.
1851







TO THE READER.

THERE are some things in the following pages which may seem difficult to be understood, and perhaps still more so to be received; but all I can ask is, that they may be read in that spirit of simplicity and prayer in which, I trust, they have been written. I have no private or party interests to subserve; but only wish to do what I may seem, in the providence of God, called to do, for that cause of Christ, of God, and humanity, which is dearer to me than anything else. And this is a consolation which always attends me, — the full belief that the truth will live and do the good which is appropriate to it, and that all error will and must die.

Some of the principles which are laid down in these pages will be found in other writers. They are clearly sustained by some passages in St. Augustine, and in other writers of an early date. They harmonize with many views and expressions which are found in the devout writings of Thauler and Arndt. The well-known and much esteemed treatise of Scougal, entitled, "The Life of God in the Soul of Man," intimates its leading ideas in its title. The object of this writer although he takes a more limited view of the subject, appears to be much the same with that which is aimed at in the present work. The view which is taken of the nature of pure or holy love, namely, that in its basis it is the love of existence, (a doctrine to which some, who have not reflected much on the subject, may have objections,) does not essentially differ, I believe, from that which is presented by President Edwards in his Treatise on the Nature of Virtue. All those writers, of various denominations of Christians, who hold to the doctrine of sanctification in the present life, as a thing provided for and attainable, agree more or less with what is here said. But this would afford but little satisfaction, if I did not fully believe that it is also in accordance with the Bible.

It is generally conceded among Christians that a better day is approaching, and the great characteristic of that day will be, and must be,
practical holiness. So that holiness of heart and life, as a matter of personal realization, is brought closely home to all. Let us, therefore, in the expressive language of Scripture, stand "with our loins girt about with truth, and having on the breastplate of righteousness." Perhaps we may be called to endure trials; but we should not forget that truth emerges safely from its conflicts, and that virtue is not destroyed, but only purified, by suffering. All things will be well, when God dwells in man.

T. C. U.

Bowdoin College, Jan. 1, 1851.







EDITOR'S NOTE: I am thankful to Google Books and archve.org for making scanned copies of all of Thomas Cogswell Upham's books available. Upham (1799–1872) is an interesting character, and his holiness books are some of the most significant ones that were written in the 19th Century. Upham was a Congregationalist minister and academic who discovered the message of Christian perfection through the ministry of Phoebe Palmer.

Upham served as Professor of Mental and Moral Philosophy at the Bowdoin College from 1825-1868. He not only taught this subject, he wrote the primary textbook on the subject:
Elements of Mental Philosophy (2 Volumes). To put it another way: Upham was teaching psychology long before the discipline had that name. His textbook on Mental Philosophy was reprinted more than 50 times, going through various editions, over a period of more than 70 years. Thus, Upham's thinking was incredibly influential in its day.

At the urgings of his wife, Upham attended some of the meetings led by Phoebe Palmer for the promotion of Christian holiness. Here he encountered the message and experience of entire sanctification. After this, he wrote several books explaining, defending, and recommending this experience.

His way of understanding psychological issues is structured differently than our present understanding — it may take a while to get used to his categories. Once this adjustment is made, however, the reader will discover many helpful insights in his writings.

(I have changed some, but not all, of the spelling in the book to conform to contemporary spelling.)


— Craig L. Adams




TABLE OF CONTENTS


PART FIRST.
OF GOD, AND THE RELATIONS HE SUSTAINS TO HIS CREATURES.


  1. On the Nature of Divine Union
  2. On the Eternity of God
  3. On the Omnipresence of God
  4. On the Greatness and Supremacy of God
  5. On the Relation of the Uncreated to the Created
  6. Summary of some Leading Principles


PART SECOND.
ON FAITH, AND THE UNION OF GOD AND MAN IN FAITH.

  1. On Faith as an Element of the Divine Nature
  2. On Faith as the Constitutive Element of Human and Divine Union
  3. On the relation of the Work of Christ to the restoration of Union
  4. The Life of Faith in Distinction from the life of Desire
  5. Of the Union of God and Man in Faith


PART THIRD.
ON THE KNOWLEDGE OF GOD, AND THE UNION OF GOD AND MAN
IN KNOWLEDGE
.

  1. All Knowledge necessary in God
  2. Human Knowledge based upon the Divine
  3. Characteristics of the Knowledge which is from God
  4. On the Gradual Development of Divine Knowledge
  5. On the Union of God and Man in Knowledge


PART FOURTH.
ON THE LOVE OF GOD, AND THE UNION OF GOD AND MAN IN LOVE.

  1. On the Nature of Pure or Holy Love
  2. On the Scripture Declaration, that "God is Love"
  3. On the Love of Existence in Distinction from the Love of Character
  4. Thoughts on the Creation of Holy Existences
  5. On the Three Forms of Love; namely, of Benevolence, of Complacency, and of Union
  6. On the Union of God and Man in Love
  7. On the Manifestations of Love in the Form of Sympathy
  8. On the Religion of Love as compared with the Religion of Obligation
  9. The Union of God with Man in Love excludes all Idolatrous Love of the Creatures


PART FIFTH.
ON THE WILL OF GOD, AND THE UNION OF THE DIVINE AND HUMAN WILL.

  1. On the Relation of the Will of God with other parts of the Divine Nature
  2. On the Perpetual Identity of the Divine Will
  3. On the Natural and Moral Supremacy of the Divine Will
  4. On the Union of the Human and Divine Will
  5. On the Different Degrees of Union with the Will of God
  6. On Training the Will to Habits of Subjection
  7. On the Relation of Suffering to Union
  8. Illustrations of the Relation between God and Man, by the Relative Position of Man and Child


PART SIXTH.
ON THE UNION OF MAN WITH GOD IN HIS PROVIDENCES.

  1. On the True Idea of Providence, and its Extent
  2. On the Law of Providence in Distinction from the General Nature or Fact of Providence
  3. On the Strictness of the Retributions of the Law of Providence
  4. Of Providence in Connection with Man's Situation in Life
  5. On the Wisdom and Goodness of God, as displayed in his Providential arrangements
  6. On the Relation of Providence to Spiritual Growth
  7. On the Law of Providence in Relation to Simplicity of Spirit
  8. Of the Union of God and Man in Providence
  9. Relation of Harmony with Providence to the Order and Disorder which exist in the World
  10. Illustrations of Interior or Spiritual Solitude
  11. The Hermit taught by an Angel


PART SEVENTH.
UNION WITH GOD IN THE WORK OF MAN'S REDEMPTION.

  1. On the Successive Developments of the Plan of Redemption
  2. Of the Three Forms of Redemption — Physical, Mental and Social
  3. Of Union with God in the Work of Mental or Personal Redemption
  4. Of Union with God in the Work of Redemption in relation to others
  5. Of Union with God in the Observances and the Duties of the Sabbath
  6. Of Union with God in the Redemption and Sanctification of the Family
  7. Of Union with God in the Work of Civil and National Redemption
  8. On Union with God in the Redemption of the Arts and Literature
  9. On the Nature and Practical Extent of the Power of Love
  10. Principles and Explanations on the Subject of Practical Holiness
  11. On the Union of Man with God in the Spirit of Prayer
  12. On the Relation of the Character of Man to the Happiness of God


PART EIGHTH.
OF THE PEACE OR REST OF THE SOUL IN A STATE OF UNION.

  1. On the True Idea of a Soul at Rest
  2. The Soul in Union rests from Reasonings
  3. The Soul in Union rests from Desires
  4. The Soul in Union rests from the Reproach of Conscience
  5. The Soul in Union rests from Disquieting Fears
  6. The Soul in Union rests from Conflicts with Providence
  7. The Soul in Union rests from the Anxieties of Labor
  8. The holy Soul has Peace, because what it wants in itself it finds in God
  9. The holy Soul has Peace, because its action ls natural and without effort
  10. The Soul in Union with God has Rest, because it has passed from the Meditative to the Contemplative State
  11. Of the Spirit and Practical Course of the Man who is at rest in God
  12. The Soul in Peace ls the true Kingdom of God